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Ightenhill Primary School

"To be the best that we can be"

History

                  History Policy

Rationale

At Ightenhill Primary School we believe that history should provide pupils with a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupil’s curiosity and provide opportunities for children to ask  perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence,  sift arguments and develop perspective and judgements.

It is our aim to develop:

KS1

Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

KS2

Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop and appropriate use of historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Teaching and Learning

Our main aim in the teaching of history at Ightenhill is to develop pupils knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history and  have a chronological awareness of when events occured. The school uses a variety of teaching strategies designed to develop the children's interest and to cater for the different learning styles of our pupils. This is achieved  through termly topic based studies delivered to a whole class. Children will be provided with opportunities to discover using a question based approach. A local sudy unit will be incorporated into the curriculum for each year group with suitable trips arranged to support these topics. Through careful planning of sources and artefacts children will be provided with opportunities to experience:

  • formulating and answering questions
  • analysing evidence
  • debating /discussing events
  • working individually, in groups or whole class
  • practical activities
  • working with ICT

Our staff have high expectations of all children, irrespective of ability, and encourage them to be successful and achieve their full potential. Where TAs are available, they are used to support individuals or groups.

Empowering Learners

As a school, we have adapted  a practice of ‘Empowering learners.’ The purpose of this curriculum is to teach children skills in order to become : self-managers, effective participators, resourceful thinkers, reflective learners, independent enquirers and effective team workers. History is taught using these skills.

Planning

A two year long –term curriculum is planned. Staff decide  when to teach their weekly  history lesson  to best fit in with the schools over-arching themes. Medium term and daily planning includes:

  • lesson  activities
  • differentiated activities
  • assessment opportunities
  • use of teacher and support
  • key questions
  • vocabulary

Teacher’s medium term plans will be based on Knowledge organisers  provided for the different history topics. Teachers will show progression by building on prior learning in previous year groups.. The children will be set history Learning Intentions at the start of each lesson.

Pupil’s records of their work

There are various ways for pupils to record their work in history. These may include:

  • formal written work demonstrating knowledge
  • group work  on other media
  • drama activities
  • diagrams / posters

Written work is completed in the child’s study unit book. The children are encouraged to work neatly using the school’s presentation policy.

Feedback

Work is marked in accordance with the feedback policy.

 

 

Assessment and record keeping

Before undertaking a history topic, the children complete a ‘pre-learning’ task. This allows the child to demonstrate to the teacher any prior knowledge they already have. As the topic is completed, teachers are able to compare pre and post learning tasks. These are filed in the children’s books. Regular review through observation of children and the marking of work informs on-going progress and next steps learning.

Monitoring and feedback

The action plan specifies the monitoring and feed back that is to be undertaken, this includes:

  • work scrutiny
  • opportunities to review the scheme
  • learning walks

The results of such activities are recorded on a serf sheet and forwarded to the headteacher.

Practical resources

Resources are stored centrally and accessed by teachers at the beginning  of a topic .  Library loan and museum boxes can be ordered from outside agents.

 

                 

 

 

 Two Year Cycle 

HISTORY

 

 Aims

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Subject content

Key stage 1

Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.

They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.

They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms.

They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events.

They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

 

Pupils should be taught about:

 

 

 

changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life

 

Home and Away

 

Why do we love to be beside the seaside?

What was *Blackpool like in the past?

 

That’s Entertainment!

 

Is the Xbox more fun than toys?

 

 

events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries]

 

Who’d live in a Castle like this?

 

What was it like when the Queen came to the                                  throne in 1953?

 

 

 

You and Whose Army?

 

What was Great about the Great Fire of London?

 

the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]

 

 

 

Rules, Rights and Responsibilities

 

How has Rosa Parks helped to make the world a better place?

 

 

Who’d live in a Castle like this?

 

What was it like when the Queen came to the                                  throne in 1953?

 

 

What on Earth?

 

 

Were Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong brave men?

 

 

You and Whose Army?

 

 

Why should we celebrate Britain and our British Values?

 

Keep Calm and Carry on!

 

Who was the bravest nurse?

 

significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

 

(Leeds and Liverpool Canal)

Water of Life

 

What happens on the Canal?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORY

 

 Aims

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world  Who first lived in Britain?
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Who was Harriet Tubman and why did she make a difference? What was special about Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela and what differences did they make?

 

Subject content

Key stage 2

 

Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.

They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.

They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

 

Pupils should be taught about:

 

 

 

  • changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

 

This could include:

  • late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers, for example, Skara Brae
  • Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for example, Stonehenge
  • Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

 

Clues from the Past

 

Who first lived in Britain?

(3/4)

 

 

  • the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

 

This could include:

  • Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC
  • the Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its army
  • successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall
  • British resistance, for example, Boudica
  • ‘Romanisation’ of Britain: sites such as Caerwent and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs, including early Christianity

 

You and Whose Army?

 

Were the Romans rotten and what did we learn from them?

(3/4)

 

 

 

  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

 

This could include:

  • Roman withdrawal from Britain in c. AD 410 and the fall of the western Roman Empire
  • Scots invasions from Ireland to north Britain (now Scotland)
  • Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life
  • Anglo-Saxon art and culture
  • Christian conversion – Canterbury, Iona and Lindisfarne

 

You and Whose Army?

 

Were the Anglo Saxons really smashing and successful? 

(5/6)

 

 

 

 

 

The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

 

This could include:

  • Viking raids and invasion
  • resistance by Alfred the Great and Athelstan, first king of England
  • further Viking invasions and Danegeld
  • Anglo-Saxon laws and justice
  • Edward the Confessor and his death in 1066

 

You and Whose Army?

 

Were the Vikings vicious and always victorious?

(5/6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A local history study

 

This could include:

 

  • a depth study linked to one of the British areas of study listed above
  • a study over time tracing how several aspects of national history are reflected in the locality (this can go beyond 1066)
  • a study of an aspect of history or a site dating from a period beyond 1066 that is significant in the locality.

 

Who would live in a Castle like this?

 

Were Norman Castles really bouncy? (3/4)

 

Who were the Pendle witches and why did they fear Lancaster castle?  (5/6)

 

There’s no Place like Home

 

How did the Industrial Revolution shape the Burnley we see today?

(5/6)

 

 

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

 

  • the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria
  • changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present or leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century
  • the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day
  • a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain

 

 

Who would live in a Castle like this?

 

Were Norman Castles really bouncy? (3/4)

 

 

Who were the Pendle witches and why did they fear Lancaster castle?  (5/6)

 

Keep Calm and Carry On!

 

 

What was it like to be a child in WW2?

(Themed week – RWB day)

 

How did Hitler convince a nation to follow him?

(5/6)

 

The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

 

Long Ago and Far Away

 

How can we re-discover the wonders of Ancient Egypt? (3/4)

 

 

Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world

 

It’s all Greek to me!

 

Who were the Ancient Greeks? (3/4)

 

 

 

A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

Long Ago and Far Away

 

Who were the Maya and what have we learnt from them? (5/6)

 

 

 

Learning Challenge Curriculum for the wider curriculum

  • What A Waste!                                                 (Cycle 1 )
  • Animal Magic                                                     (Cycle 2)
  • Rules, Rights and Responsibilities              (Cycle 1 and 3)   **Update to reflect Black Lives Matter**
  • Who Invented That?                                       (Cycle 2) **Muslim inventors**

National Curriculum - The school curriculum in England

2.1 Every state-funded school must offer a curriculum which is balanced and broadly based and which:

  • promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and
  • prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life.

2.5 All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice. Schools are also free to include other subjects or topics of their choice in planning and designing their own programme of education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History: Governor walk round 23.01.20

Lessons

There are at least two study unit lessons a week.

Lessons begin with new vocabulary being introduced and a question.

The learning by the end of the lesson should help to provide the answer to the question.

There are strong cross- curricular links with English and maths .Example: During Black History month corridor three studied the book Henry’s Freedom Box in English and currently we are studying The Egyptian Cinderella. Skills learnt to write a diary in English can be used to produce a diary for Howard Carter.

A strong emphasis is placed on children being able to place periods successfully in chronological order using time vocabulary.

Corridor 2

Corridor two’s study unit this term is a history/geography based unit exploring pirates. Their question is:

Were real pirates like captain Jack Sparrow?

 

Corridor 3

The question this term is:

How can we re-discover the wonders of Ancient Egypt?

The children are studying artefacts and discovering the clues they provide about Ancient Egypt.

 

Corridor 4

The question this term is:

Who were the Mayas and what have we learnt from them?

They are looking at the Maya civilization, there beliefs, number system and where they fit in history.

 

Targets

KS1 is a two year cycle

KS2 is a four year cycle

This means that certain targets might not be covered in the year group shown. As planning is done on corridors year five might cover some of the year six targets this term. Or year three some of the year four targets. Over the cycle they should meet most targets.

Assessment

Regular book scrutinys

Talks with children

Target sheets at front of study unit books

 Targets

Year one historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

I can use words and phrases like: old, new and a long time ago.

 

 

I can recognise that some objects belonged to the past.

 

 

I can explain how I have changed since I was born.

 

 

I can explain how some people have helped us to have better lives.

 

 

I can ask and answer questions about old and new objects.

 

 

I can spot old and new things in a picture.

 

 

I can explain what an object from the past might have been used for.

 

 

Year two historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

I can use words and phrases like: before, after, past, present, then and now.

 

 

I can recount the life of someone famous from Britain who lived in the past. I can explain what they did earlier and what they did later.

 

 

I can give example of things that were different when my grandparents were children.

 

 

I can find out things about the past by talking  to an older person.

 

 

I can answer questions using books and the internet.

 

 

I can research the life of a famous person from the past using different source of evidence.

 

 

Year three historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

 I can describe events from the past using dates when things happened.

 

 

I can use a timeline within a specific period of history to set out the order that things may have happened.

 

 

I can use my mathematical knowledge to work out how long ago events happened.

 

 

I can explain some of the times when Britain has been invaded.

 

 

I can use research skills to find answers to specific historical questions.

 

 

I can research in order to find similarities and differences between two or more periods of history.

 

 

 

Year four historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

I can plot events on a timeline using centuries.

 

 

I can use my mathematical skills to round up time differences into centuries and decades.

 

 

I can explain how the lives of wealthy people were different from the lives  of poorer people.

 

 

I can explain how historic items and artefacts can be used to help build up a picture of life in the past.

 

 

I can explain how an event from the past has shaped our life today.

 

 

I can research two versions of an event and explain how they differ.

 

 

I can research what it was like for children in a given period of history and present my findings to an audience.

 

 

 

Year five historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

I can draw a timeline with different historical periods showing key historical events or lives of significant people.

 

 

I can compare two or more historical periods; explaining things which changed and things which stayed the same.

 

 

I can explain how Parliament affects decision making in England

 

 

I can explain how our locality has changed over time.

 

 

I can test out a hypothesis in order to answer questions.

 

 

I can describe how crime and punishment has changed over a period of time.

 

 

Year six historian at Ightenhill Primary

      Targets

experienced

secure

I can place features of historical events and people from the past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

 

 

I can summarise the main events from a period of history, explaining the order of events and what happened.

 

 

I can summarise how Britain has had a major influence on the world.

 

 

I can summarise how Britain may have learnt from  other countries and civilizations (historically and more recently).

 

 

I can identify and explain propaganda.

 

 

I can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

 

 

I can describe the features of historical events and way of life from periods I have studied; presenting to an audience.

 

 

VE Day 2020

The Royal British Legion calls on the nation to mark the 75th anniversary of VE Day from home.

 

Join us on Friday 8 May as we pay tribute to the service and sacrifice of the entire Second World War generation, from British, Commonwealth and Allied Forces to evacuees and those who served on the home front. As we face some of the most challenging times since the end of the Second World War, now more than ever it is important to unite in recognition of service to the nation, just as communities did 75 years ago.

 

A schedule of events can be found on the website below.

 

https://www.britishlegion.org.uk

 

We have also uploaded some nice activities for you to try at home. Send in photographs of your work, creations and celebrations to Mr Farrar, who will arrange for some prizes for the best work. 

ightenhillclass9@ightenhill.lancs.sch.uk

Year 1 - Constructing Modes of Transport

Year 5 - Olympics 

As part of our Olympic topic the year 5 children choose an Olympian from the past to create using clay. They then used this model to create a presentation for the rest of the class about their chosen athlete. 

Red, White and Blue Day

 

Red, White and Blue Day was enjoyed by all the children at Ightenhill. Activities were organised to celebrate the centenary of the Battle of the Somme and the Battle of Jutland. Here are some pictures of the children in class three and four, who were making paper boats.

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